About / Interviews & Press

Ellipsis Press was started in 2007 by Johannah Rodgers and Eugene Lim.

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Managing Editor — Eugene Lim

Editor — Corey Frost

Editor at large — Johannah Rodgers

Publicity Director — Joanna Sondheim

Intern 2010-2011 — Michael Purwin

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Eugene‘s writings have appeared in Fence, The Denver Quarterly, exploringFICTIONSThe Brooklyn Rail, JacketSleeping Fish, elimae and elsewhere. He is the author of the novels Fog & Car (Ellipsis Press, 2008) and The Strangers (Black Square Editions, 2013).

Corey is the author of My Own Devices: Airport Version and The Worthwhile Flux. An award-winning spoken word artist, he is currently writing a book-length essay about spoken word as part of a doctoral program in English at the City University of New York. His writings have appeared in Matrix, Geist, The Walrus, and elsewhere. Recent work includes the detective serial/internet puzzle The Dog Ate My Serial.

Johannah’s chapbook Necessary Fictions was published by Sona Books in 2003, and her short stories and essays have appeared in Fiction, CHAIN Arts, The Brooklyn Rail, Pierogi Press, Harp & Altar, and Fence. Her book sentences, a collection of stories, essays, and artwork, was published in 2007 by Red Dust Press.

Joanna’s poetry has appeared in Unsaid, Harp & Altar, canwehaveourballback, sonaweb, LitVert, Boog City, Bird Dog and elsewhere. Two chapbooks–The Fit and Thaumatrope–are available from Sona Books.

Interviews and Press


American Book Review statement for their issue on “Micropresses”

In 2010, the American Book Review featured several small presses including Ellipsis. Here’s an excerpt:

Relative to commercial publishers, micropresses are unconcerned with financial risk. This is not to say that micropresses are free of debt or that they don’t need your contributions or purchases but to highlight the fact that their purpose and structure are found largely outside of the profit motive. Because of this and because of new, cheaper methods of production and distribution, these presses are uniquely positioned to publish—in sustainable and not-so-micro ways—cutting-edge, high-quality literature.
Like other micropresses, Ellipsis Press is taking advantage of cheaper production methods to promote works that succeed in making new forms in order to express something previously unexpressed, to expand the realm of the articulable. The truth is such literature has always been unprofitable, but as O’Brien also wrote in 1996, “The purest form of American censorship is reducing books to their marketplace value.” Thankfully and importantly, a growing number of upstarts are taking a radical and only recently sustainable position: defining literary value independent of the dollar.

Ellipsis Press: Relative to commercial publishers, micropresses are unconcerned with financial risk. This is not to say that micropresses are free of debt or that they don’t need your contributions or purchases but to highlight the fact that their purpose and structure are found largely outside of the profit motive. Because of this and because of new, cheaper methods of production and distribution, these presses are uniquely positioned to publish—in sustainable and not-so-micro ways—cutting-edge, high-quality literature.

…Like other micropresses, Ellipsis Press is taking advantage of cheaper production methods to promote works that succeed in making new forms in order to express something previously unexpressed, to expand the realm of the articulable. The truth is such literature has always been unprofitable…

Thankfully and importantly, a growing number of upstarts are taking a radical and only recently sustainable position: defining literary value independent of the dollar.

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Hayden’s Ferry interview

In 2010, Hayden’s Ferry interviewed several small presses for Small Press Month, including Ellipsis. Here’s an excerpt:

Q: What advice do you have for emerging writers looking to be published by a small press? What is it about a work that makes you want to publish it?

Ellipsis Press: One person’s gutsy transgression is another’s mere novelty. What we’re looking for is structural or stylistic innovation which also has an intellectual and emotional payoff. This pleasure should be fairly immediately apparent, i.e. not overly delayed or latent (though we can be teased). We will often jump randomly to pages and read whole paragraphs; if your work has a consistency of purpose and language, we’ll read more.

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Small Press e-panel on the Emerging Writers Network.

In 2008 Ellipsis Press participated on an e-panel with several other new presses–organized by Dan Wickett of DZANC books. Here’s an excerpt:

Q: Do you see signs that there is some form of an indie movement going on? Why with all the dreaded “publishing is dead” articles and talk do you think so many people are starting up at ground level right now?

Ellipsis Press: I’d like to think an indie movement is going on. Twelve years ago there was an issue of The Review of Contemporary Fiction, titled “The Future of Fiction,” and edited by none other than David Foster Wallace. In it, there’s a hilarious and dead-on piece by Dalkey head John O’Brien, which stated among other things that the “end of literary books in commercial publishing is a historical inevitability.” And so it has come to pass. The bigger houses will cease (have ceased!) to publish literary fiction. It is not profitable for them to market and produce a title that will sell to 5000 people (even if Rick Moody strong-arms a National Book Award for them). S’okay though. The old publishing joke goes, How do you make a small fortune in publishing? Answer: Start with a large one. And then you and your crony get to laugh bitterly together. But it’s the wrong question. A small and lively (and one hopes resurging) group of people care about the novel as art. And with the new methods of production and distribution, it’s getting easier for writers to connect with readers.

Read the complete panel at:http://emergingwriters.typepad.com/emerging_writers_network/2008/09/e-panel-publish.html